Classroom Culture

Unit 7

Culture_1@4x.png

Classroom Culture

Unit 7

Common Language refers to the knowledge and concepts that a practitioners need to know to understand vulnerability factors and their impact on the learning experience.  

 

 

Common language provides the “why” and the rationale for the strategies, practices, and tools  in the Mockingbird Methodology. A common language helps us provide more compassionate and responsive learning experiences.

A common and shared language about vulnerability improves  communication, learning, knowledge sharing, problem-solving, and collaboration among colleagues.  

The Iceberg graphically demonstrates how culture is composed of both visible (above the water) and invisible (below the water) elements.

The Iceberg Model helps us understand the role that invisible cultural elements play in culture-building.

Culture Terminology

A monolithic culture refers to a society or group characterized by a single, uniform set of beliefs, values, customs, and practices. In such a culture, there is little diversity or variation in the way people think, behave, or interact with one another.

 

Monolithic cultures often lack the richness and complexity of more diverse and pluralistic societies, where different perspectives, traditions, and backgrounds contribute to a broader tapestry of human experiences.

 
It's important to note that in reality, truly monolithic cultures are rare, as most societies exhibit some degree of diversity and variation among their members.

Dominant culture refers to the primary and prevailing set of beliefs, values, norms, and practices that are widely accepted and followed within a particular society or group. It often holds the most influence, visibility, and power, shaping the mainstream social and cultural norms.

 

 

A subculture is a smaller, distinct cultural group within a larger society that possesses its own unique beliefs, values, and practices. Subcultures may emerge as a response to or rejection of elements of the dominant culture, and they often provide a sense of belonging and identity to individuals who may not fully align with the mainstream cultural norms

Bicultural is when an Individual functions in both worlds and adopts characteristics of both cultures. Bicultural individuals are often code-switching.

Multicultural refers to the presence and recognition of diverse cultures, ethnicities, and backgrounds within a society or community. It signifies an environment where people from various cultural backgrounds coexist and interact, often promoting inclusivity, respect, and appreciation for the differences among them. Multiculturalism encourages the celebration of cultural diversity and aims to create a more inclusive and harmonious society by valuing the contributions and perspectives of all its members, regardless of their cultural heritage.

Assimilation is when the initial culture is abandoned and the mainstream or dominant cultural norms are adopted.

Code-switching is the practice of moving back and forth between different cultures.

Cultural mismatch is when the mainstream (dominant) culture is different from the learner’s first culture.

The Anchor Model outlines the steps for creating and anchoring values into community culture. Diverse communities need unifying beliefs and values that bond community members to each other and that create a shared sense of identity. Creating unifying culture events that anchor values into community culture.

Culture development requires proactive and intentional planning. Creating shared beliefs and values and using these values to guide community behaviors and events fosters bonding and collaboration and creates a sense of belonging among community members.   

Identify beliefs and values that serve your program goals.

Introduce values to learners (and staff ) through an immersive and unifying experience.

FLOOD the program with signals about the values.

Visit values with frequency and intensity to help learners (and staff) practice and internalize values.

Examples of Community Values

Common Language refers to the knowledge and concepts that a practitioners need to know to understand vulnerability factors and their impact on the learning experience.  

 

 

Common language provides the “why” and the rationale for the strategies, practices, and tools  in the Mockingbird Methodology. A common language helps us provide more compassionate and responsive learning experiences.

A common and shared language about vulnerability improves  communication, learning, knowledge sharing, problem-solving, and collaboration among colleagues.  

The Iceberg graphically demonstrates how culture is composed of both visible (above the water) and invisible (below the water) elements.

The Iceberg Model helps us understand the role that invisible cultural elements play in culture-building.

Culture Terminology

A monolithic culture refers to a society or group characterized by a single, uniform set of beliefs, values, customs, and practices. In such a culture, there is little diversity or variation in the way people think, behave, or interact with one another.

 

Monolithic cultures often lack the richness and complexity of more diverse and pluralistic societies, where different perspectives, traditions, and backgrounds contribute to a broader tapestry of human experiences.

 
It's important to note that in reality, truly monolithic cultures are rare, as most societies exhibit some degree of diversity and variation among their members.

Dominant culture refers to the primary and prevailing set of beliefs, values, norms, and practices that are widely accepted and followed within a particular society or group. It often holds the most influence, visibility, and power, shaping the mainstream social and cultural norms.

 

 

A subculture is a smaller, distinct cultural group within a larger society that possesses its own unique beliefs, values, and practices. Subcultures may emerge as a response to or rejection of elements of the dominant culture, and they often provide a sense of belonging and identity to individuals who may not fully align with the mainstream cultural norms

Bicultural is when an Individual functions in both worlds and adopts characteristics of both cultures. Bicultural individuals are often code-switching.

Multicultural refers to the presence and recognition of diverse cultures, ethnicities, and backgrounds within a society or community. It signifies an environment where people from various cultural backgrounds coexist and interact, often promoting inclusivity, respect, and appreciation for the differences among them. Multiculturalism encourages the celebration of cultural diversity and aims to create a more inclusive and harmonious society by valuing the contributions and perspectives of all its members, regardless of their cultural heritage.

Assimilation is when the initial culture is abandoned and the mainstream or dominant cultural norms are adopted.

Code-switching is the practice of moving back and forth between different cultures.

Cultural mismatch is when the mainstream (dominant) culture is different from the learner’s first culture.

The Anchor Model outlines the steps for creating and anchoring values into community culture. Diverse communities need unifying beliefs and values that bond community members to each other and that create a shared sense of identity. Creating unifying culture events that anchor values into community culture.

Culture development requires proactive and intentional planning. Creating shared beliefs and values and using these values to guide community behaviors and events fosters bonding and collaboration and creates a sense of belonging among community members.   

Identify beliefs and values that serve your program goals.

Introduce values to learners (and staff ) through an immersive and unifying experience.

FLOOD the program with signals about the values.

Visit values with frequency and intensity to help learners (and staff) practice and internalize values.

Examples of Community Values