The Laws
The Mockingbird Laws

Building and Understanding Psychosocial Solutions

The Laws

Explore the Laws for the different strategies in the Mockingbird Methodology

The Doors of Trust

Meet the Laws for the Doors of Trust

Understand and Explore the Mockingbird Laws of Learning

The Laws of Trauma
&
The Laws of Power
Engagement

Meet the Laws for the Engagement Strategies

Understand and Explore the Mockingbird Laws of Learning

The Laws of Attention
&
The Laws of Working Memory
Andragogy

Meet the Laws for the Frames of Andragogy

Understand and Explore the Mockingbird Laws of Learning

The Laws of Andragogy
Productive Participation

Meet the Laws for Productive Participation

Understand and Explore the Mockingbird Laws of Learning

The Laws of Social Learning
Classroom Culture

Meet the Laws for Classroom Culture

Understand and Explore the Mockingbird Laws of Learning

The Laws of
Classroom Culture
Collaborative Coaching

Meet the Laws for Collaborative Coaching

Understand and Explore the Mockingbird Laws of Learning

The Laws of Collaboration

The Doors of Trust

Understanding the Laws

The laws are representative concepts and principles representing research and  fundamental norms, theorems, and ideas from various, and often multiple fields of study.

Understanding the Laws of Trauma & Laws of Power

The Laws of Trauma Description
Brains in Pain Struggle to Learn Over time, stress, trauma, and other biopsychosocial conditions can alter and negatively impact the physiology of the brain impacting memory functions that help us process, encode, retrieve, and retain information. Traumatized brains struggle to learn. The traumatized brain affords most of its energy toward survival and the least amount to learning. Attention systems (like the reticular activating system) become hyper-vigilant. Instead of focusing on learning, the brain is focused on searching for threats.
There is No Overreacting in Trauma Trauma can make the student hyper-vigilant to threats. Students are not overreacting. Remove 'over' from your language as students are not reacting to the present, but to the past and past experiences. The response is in direct proportion to the trauma experienced previously.
Traumatized Brains Experience Weakened Executive Functioning Trauma impacts how the brain coordinates executive responses and reactions. Following traumatic events, the prefrontal cortex responses are weakened while responses to threats are strengthened.
Traumatized Brains Are Reward-Seeking The traumatized brain responds less robustly to rewards, which in turn increases reward-seeking behavior. This impairment affects learning by directly affecting student' motivation, attention, decision-making, and ability to respond to different types of reinforcement in the classroom, an essential part of learning new skills.
Traumatized Brains Are Hyper-Vigilant The traumatized brain is hypersensitive to emotional stimuli and has greater difficulty disengaging from emotional stimulus.
The Laws of Power Description
Past Experiences Shape Our Definitions Our past experiences with power shape our perceptions of it and our willingness to trust.
Framing Influences Perception However small, subtle changes in language can have a positive and significant impact on how a message is received. Messaging and communication are key!
Power Dynamics Impact Trust-Building Power dynamics can disrupt the emotion of trust! It is important to be sensitive to these dynamics and how they may affect learners.

Engagement Strategies

Understanding the Laws

The laws are representative concepts and principles representing research and  fundamental norms, theorems, and ideas from various, and often multiple fields of study.

Understanding the Laws of Attention & Laws of Working Memory

The Laws of Attention Description
Attention Has Limited Sustainability Attention has limited sustainability due to the brain's working memory capacity. However, cognitive learning strategies like the Wheel of Engagement can be employed to overcome or reduce these limitations by engaging learners in activities that promote active processing, meaningful connections, and deep understanding. By leveraging these strategies, learners can optimize their learning experience and enhance the retention and transfer of information.
Attention Has Priorities Attention has priorities for learners due to the magnification of attention and working memory limitations caused by adversities such as trauma and toxic stress.
Power Dynamics Impact Trust-Building When power is imbalanced in a relationship or environment, trust can be hindered or eroded. Vulnerable individuals, in particular, require reassurance and transparency from those in positions of power to establish trust.
Attention Has Imperfect Selectivity Attention is imperfect! Internal and external stimulus can interfere with a learners ability to learn and reiterate information and learning material.
Attention Does Not Multi-Task While attention can be optimized and directed to specific tasks or stimuli, it cannot effectively divide its resources among multiple tasks simultaneously. Focus on specific tasks or activities with specific goals in mind.
The Laws of Working Memory Description
Working Memory Has Limited Capacity Attention has limited sustainability due to the brain's working memory capacity. However, cognitive learning strategies like the Wheel of Engagement can be employed to overcome or reduce these limitations by engaging learners in activities that promote active processing, meaningful connections, and deep understanding. By leveraging these strategies, learners can optimize their learning experience and enhance the retention and transfer of information.
Working Memory Is Easily Overloaded Attention has priorities for learners due to the magnification of attention and working memory limitations caused by adversities such as trauma and toxic stress.

Andragogy

Understanding the Laws

The laws are representative concepts and principles representing research and  fundamental norms, theorems, and ideas from various, and often multiple fields of study.

Understanding the Laws of Andragogy

The Laws of Andragogy Description
Life Experiences Adult learners have life experiences and they use these experiences as a filter during learning to prioritize information and make sense of what they are learning. This is a vehicle for instruction. This is different than pedagogy where students lack life experiences for much of the knowledge they are learning.
Power Equivalency Adult learners share the same autonomy and independence as the instructor. This impacts relationships and interactions in the classroom pedagogy as teachers are disciplinarians and use their authority to regulate behavior.
Self-Knowledge Adult learners are more self-aware than younger learners. They are the experts on their needs. This does not mean that these learners are always accurate or that they advocate for their needs.
Learning Goals Adult learners have specific goals that are tied to employment, family, personal growth. Learning is seldom for the sake of learning.
Time Urgency Adult learners have urgency with time. They control the decisions regarding their schedule and do not want time wasted.
Voice & Choice Adult learners have autonomy and a sense of self-advocacy in ways that children do not.

Mentor Care Model

Understanding the Laws

The laws are representative concepts and principles representing research and  fundamental norms, theorems, and ideas from various, and often multiple fields of study.

Understanding the Laws of Mentoring

The Laws of Mentoring Description
Life Experiences Adult learners have life experiences and they use these experiences as a filter during learning to prioritize information and make sense of what they are learning. This is a vehicle for instruction. This is different than pedagogy where students lack life experiences for much of the knowledge they are learning.
Power Equivalency Adult learners share the same autonomy and independence as the instructor. This impacts relationships and interactions in the classroom pedagogy as teachers are disciplinarians and use their authority to regulate behavior.
Self-Knowledge Adult learners are more self-aware than younger learners. They are the experts on their needs. This does not mean that these learners are always accurate or that they advocate for their needs.
Learning Goals Adult learners have specific goals that are tied to employment, family, personal growth. Learning is seldom for the sake of learning.
Time Urgency Adult learners have urgency with time. They control the decisions regarding their schedule and do not want time wasted.
Voice & Choice Adult learners have autonomy and a sense of self-advocacy in ways that children do not.

Coaching

Understanding the Laws

The laws are representative concepts and principles representing research and  fundamental norms, theorems, and ideas from various, and often multiple fields of study.

Understanding the Laws of Andragogy

The Laws of Empowerment Description
Learned Self-Helplessness Learners, due to repeated experiences of failure or perceived lack of control, develop a belief that their efforts will not lead to desired outcomes. As a result, they may adopt a mindset of quitting or giving up, even when opportunities for success exist.
External Events Have Control Learners attribute the control of their life and circumstances solely to external factors, such as circumstances, other people's actions, or luck. They may perceive themselves as passive recipients of their life experiences, believing that external events have the power to shape their lives without considering their own agency or ability to influence outcomes.
Internal Events Have Control Learners have the power to control their lives through their internal experiences, such as thoughts, beliefs, emotions, and attitudes. It emphasizes the recognition that one's internal world significantly influences their perception, actions, and overall well-being, enabling individuals to take responsibility for their thoughts and emotions as they navigate life's challenges.
Myelination Increases Habituation Through repeated practice and experience, the brain undergoes a process called myelination, which involves the formation of a protective sheath around neural pathways. Increased myelination enhances the efficiency and speed of neuronal communication, facilitating the development of habituationthe process of forming and strengthening habitual behaviors or skills.
Behavioral Change Is a Process Lasting behavioral change requires a gradual and continuous process of transformation, rather than being achieved through isolated or one-time events. It acknowledges that sustained change involves multiple stages, including awareness, intention, action, and maintenance, and underscores the importance of consistent effort and commitment to create long-term shifts in behavior.
Whole Person Solutions Effective behavioral change requires holistic approaches that consider and address various aspects of an individual's life, including their physical, mental, emotional, and social well-being. It underscores the interconnectedness of different domains of life and highlights the significance of integrated solutions that take into account the whole person, their environment, and the interplay between different factors influencing behavior.
Internal Dialogue is a Habit Learners talk to themselves internally, the thoughts and self-talk they engage in, can become habitual patterns that influence their perception, behavior, and overall mindset. It emphasizes the understanding that the nature and quality of one's internal dialogue can significantly impact their self-beliefs, motivation, and ultimately their actions and outcomes.

Productive Participation

Understanding the Laws

The laws are representative concepts and principles representing research and  fundamental norms, theorems, and ideas from various, and often multiple fields of study.