Lesson 1, Topic 1
In Progress

Trust Conversations

Trust Conversations

In the Doors of Trust Playbook

Play One

trust@4x-1.png

Trust Conversations

In the Doors of Trust Playbook

Play One

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A trust conversation is an instructor-led discussion aimed at establishing a collective understanding of trust and its significance in both learning and classroom interactions. The primary objective is to foster a shared definition and comprehension of trust, along with its impact on the educational process.

This strategy is...
 
  • Leading a conversation about trust-building to define trust and establish clear expectations and boundaries. Trust is creating safety, support and sense of belonging.
  • Making a commitment to students to earn student trust.
  • Inviting students to hold you accountable to the commitment.
  • Reinforcing the elements of trust defined in the conversation thought activities, lessons and activities. 

 

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A trust conversation is an instructor-led discussion aimed at establishing a collective understanding of trust and its significance in both learning and classroom interactions. The primary objective is to foster a shared definition and comprehension of trust, along with its impact on the educational process.

This strategy is...
 
  • Leading a conversation about trust-building to define trust and establish clear expectations and boundaries. Trust is creating safety, support and sense of belonging.
  • Making a commitment to students to earn student trust.
  • Inviting students to hold you accountable to the commitment.
  • Reinforcing the elements of trust defined in the conversation thought activities, lessons and activities. 

 

Click to Enlarge

Click to Enlarge

Trust Conversations help staff navigate and mediate the following vulnerability factors…

The inherent power imbalance between students and authority figures in the educational system can be particularly challenging for traumatized or vulnerable students. They may feel disempowered or voiceless, which can further exacerbate feelings of vulnerability.

 

Traumatized or vulnerable students may perceive people in positions of power, such as teachers or administrators, as potential threats. This perception can lead to heightened anxiety, defensiveness, or avoidance in their interactions with authority figures.

 

Trauma can lead to hyper-vigilance, where students are constantly on edge and mistrustful of their surroundings. They may find it challenging to trust teachers, viewing them with suspicion or fear, especially if the traumatic experience involved an authority figure.

 

Traumatized and vulnerable students may resort to avoidance and social isolation as coping mechanisms. They may withdraw from teachers and peers, making it difficult to build relationships based on trust and rapport.

 

Trauma can disrupt a student's ability to form secure attachments. They may struggle to connect emotionally with teachers and may be hesitant to open up or seek support because they fear abandonment or rejection.

 

Traumatized students might adopt defensive behaviors as a way to protect themselves from perceived threats. This can include being resistant, argumentative, or uncooperative with authority figures.

 

Negative interactions with authority figures can reinforce a student's trauma or feelings of vulnerability. This can create a cycle where the student's perception of power dynamics becomes increasingly negative.

 

Negative interactions with authority figures can reinforce a student's trauma or feelings of vulnerability. This can create a cycle where the student's perception of power dynamics becomes increasingly negative.

 

Trauma can lead to a resistance to authority figures, including teachers. Students may resist following rules or instructions, making it difficult for teachers to establish a positive rapport.

 

Trauma can erode a student's self-esteem and self-worth. This negative self-perception can make it difficult for them to believe that teachers genuinely care about their well-being, hindering the development of trust.

 

Why Trust Conversations Work?

When we facilitate a trust conversation, we disrupt the communication and leadership norms that participants generally expect from people in positions of authority. Authority figures normally expect compliance and deference. Leaders expect trust, compliance, and respect out of deference for their role as an authority figure. When we open a conversation about trust and explain our intention and commitment to earning trust, we disrupt hierarchal norms .

A trust conversation signals our understanding of the power imbalance and communicates our intention to use transparency and collaboration rather than authority and compliance as a vehicle for interaction. Acknowledging and disrupting power differentials signals our interest in collaboration and open communication.

When we make a commitment to participants to be trustworthy and ask participants to hold us accountable to this commitment, we give community members agency and invite participants to play an active role in the relationship. This commitment and invitation communicates our commitment and confidence in our future behavior and our interest and commitment to establishing a collaborative relationship.

Trust Conversations help staff navigate and mediate the following vulnerability factors…

The inherent power imbalance between students and authority figures in the educational system can be particularly challenging for traumatized or vulnerable students. They may feel disempowered or voiceless, which can further exacerbate feelings of vulnerability.

 

Traumatized or vulnerable students may perceive people in positions of power, such as teachers or administrators, as potential threats. This perception can lead to heightened anxiety, defensiveness, or avoidance in their interactions with authority figures.

 

Trauma can lead to hyper-vigilance, where students are constantly on edge and mistrustful of their surroundings. They may find it challenging to trust teachers, viewing them with suspicion or fear, especially if the traumatic experience involved an authority figure.

 

Traumatized and vulnerable students may resort to avoidance and social isolation as coping mechanisms. They may withdraw from teachers and peers, making it difficult to build relationships based on trust and rapport.

 

Trauma can disrupt a student's ability to form secure attachments. They may struggle to connect emotionally with teachers and may be hesitant to open up or seek support because they fear abandonment or rejection.

 

Traumatized students might adopt defensive behaviors as a way to protect themselves from perceived threats. This can include being resistant, argumentative, or uncooperative with authority figures.

 

Negative interactions with authority figures can reinforce a student's trauma or feelings of vulnerability. This can create a cycle where the student's perception of power dynamics becomes increasingly negative.

 

Negative interactions with authority figures can reinforce a student's trauma or feelings of vulnerability. This can create a cycle where the student's perception of power dynamics becomes increasingly negative.

 

Trauma can lead to a resistance to authority figures, including teachers. Students may resist following rules or instructions, making it difficult for teachers to establish a positive rapport.

 

Trauma can erode a student's self-esteem and self-worth. This negative self-perception can make it difficult for them to believe that teachers genuinely care about their well-being, hindering the development of trust.

 

Why Trust Conversations Work?

When we facilitate a trust conversation, we disrupt the communication and leadership norms that participants generally expect from people in positions of authority. Authority figures normally expect compliance and deference. Leaders expect trust, compliance, and respect out of deference for their role as an authority figure. When we open a conversation about trust and explain our intention and commitment to earning trust, we disrupt hierarchal norms .

A trust conversation signals our understanding of the power imbalance and communicates our intention to use transparency and collaboration rather than authority and compliance as a vehicle for interaction. Acknowledging and disrupting power differentials signals our interest in collaboration and open communication.

When we make a commitment to participants to be trustworthy and ask participants to hold us accountable to this commitment, we give community members agency and invite participants to play an active role in the relationship. This commitment and invitation communicates our commitment and confidence in our future behavior and our interest and commitment to establishing a collaborative relationship.

Understanding Visual Cues

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See resources below

Why Visual Cues Works?

Visual cues are powerful tools for habit formation because they capitalize on the way our brains process information and make decisions. This visual cue system provides a constant, tangible reminder of your goal and offers a structured means to reinforce your new teaching behavior until it becomes second nature.

See Resources for visual Cue Resources

Understanding Visual Cues

Click to Enlarge
 
Click to Enlarge
 

See Resources for visual Cue Resources

Why Visual Cues Works?

Visual cues are powerful tools for habit formation because they capitalize on the way our brains process information and make decisions. This visual cue system provides a constant, tangible reminder of your goal and offers a structured means to reinforce your new teaching behavior until it becomes second nature.

Steps

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Why Deliberate Practice works?

Deliberate practice works because it systematically combines focused goal-setting, immediate feedback, repetitive effort, and continuous adaptation to challenge individuals to stretch beyond their current abilities, ultimately reshaping neural pathways and automating skills.

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Steps

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Why Deliberate Practice works?

Deliberate practice works because it systematically combines focused goal-setting, immediate feedback, repetitive effort, and continuous adaptation to challenge individuals to stretch beyond their current abilities, ultimately reshaping neural pathways and automating skills.

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RTG Stages

Novice

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Expert

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